Articles Tagged with domestic violence

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When most people hear the term “domestic abuse,” they tend to think of an abusive spouse or partner who uses physical violence to control or dominate the other person involved in the relationship. While this type of violence certainly occurs and is a serious issue, abuse between spouses can take many forms, many of which are nonviolent. Importantly, whether or not domestic abuse has occurred can have a significant impact on the way that a divorce is resolved in terms of child custody, property division, and alimony, so it important for anyone going through a divorce to discuss the matter with an attorney in order to determine whether domestic violence has, in fact, occurred in a particular case. Some of the more common non-physical forms of domestic abuse are discussed below.

Emotional Abuse

Emotional abuse generally involves behavior that undermines a person’s self-esteem or results in a situation in which the abuser can exert significant control over the victim. This kind of abuse can include verbal threats, put-downs, yelling, humiliating, victim-blaming, isolating, and intimidation. In serious cases, victims of emotional abuse can develop serious psychological issues such as depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Continue reading

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Domestic violence or the threat of violence can endanger the physical, emotional, and mental well-being of you and your children. Many victims of domestic abuse from a spouse are hesitant to leave their marriages out of fear of the potential retaliation from their spouse. Anyone who is fearful should be aware of legal tools in Florida that can help to protect victims of domestic violence and their children. For example, a protective order will legally prevent a spouse from coming near or contacting you or your children or they may face serious legal penalties.

If a victim of domestic violence does decide it is time to leave a marriage, it is understandable that he or she would want to legally dissolve the marriage as soon as possible. Some individuals run into difficulties, however, if they have only recently moved to the state of Florida. This is because Florida law requires you to live within the state for six months before a family court judge will grant you a divorce.

Bill to Make an Exception for Domestic Violence Victims