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Extravagant Requests in Recent “Walmart Divorce”

Paige Laurie, the granddaughter of Walmart founder James “Bud” Walton, married Patrick Bode Dubbert in a reportedly over-the-top ceremony in 2008. Prior to the marriage, the couple signed a premarital agreement that stated, should the marriage end, Laurie agreed to pay $30,000 per month in spousal support for half of the time the marriage lasted. Last spring, after nearly six years of marriage, Laurie filed for divorce.

Though Laurie has reportedly agreed to abide by the spousal support guidelines agreed upon in the premarital agreement, Dubbert has been trying to invalidate the prenup. While it may seem illogical to fight against an agreement that awards you nearly $1.1 million, Dubbert apparently believes that he requires substantially more support than previously agreed upon. Specifically, Dubbert has filed a lawsuit that requests support for the following “necessities” every month:

  • $40,000 – $60,000 for a rental home
  • $80,000 for entertainment
  • $30,000 for vacations
  • $10,000 for furniture
  • $6,700 for a personal chef
  • $5,000 for clothes purchases
  • $4,000 for a personal driver
  • $2,500 for a personal trainer
  • $1,000 for a personal stylist
  • $2,500 for charitable donations

These are only some of the necessities Dubbert cites, as the total amount amount adds to about $240,000 per month after taxes ($400,000 before taxes). Dubbert argues that because he no longer works for Laurie’s company, he requires such support to find a new way to support the lifestyle to which he has become accustomed.

Can a premarital agreement be invalidated?

Like any other type of contract, a premarital agreement has certain requirements in order to be enforceable. If such requirements are not met or other certain circumstances exist, it may be possible for one spouse to invalidate the agreement. The following are examples of reasons a prenup may be invalid:

  • One party signed under duress or coercion
  • One party did not have independent representation by an attorney
  • There was not full disclosure of a party’s financial situation
  • Terms are ambiguous or unconscionable
  • Promises made in the agreement were not kept
  • The agreement was not in writing

Specifically, Dubbert claims that he had originally retained legal counsel to review and negotiate the prenup but that Laurie had convinced him not to use the attorney due to a lack of experience with high-asset marriages. Dubbert also claims that he signed the premarital agreement under duress since Laurie’s parents allegedly presented him with an ultimatum that they would not pay for the wedding expenses if he did not sign. Whether or not these reasons will be enough to invalidate part or all the prenuptial agreement remains to seen, and even if the spousal support portion is invalidated, it seems unlikely that a court would approve Dubbert’s extravagant requests.

Contact a Boca Raton family law attorney today to schedule a free consultation

One does not need a Walton-esque family fortune to be able to benefit from a well-crafted premarital agreement. As a result, anyone considering getting married should discuss their circumstances with an attorney, as circumstances can and often do change. Alan Burton has been practicing family law in Florida for over 30 years and maintains offices in Boca Raton and Fort Lauderdale. To schedule a free consultation with Mr. Burton, call our offices at (954) 229-1660 or (954) 295-9222.