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What is a marital asset and marital liability?

Marital assets and liabilities are defined as follows:

Assets acquired and liabilities incurred during the marriage, individually by either spouse or jointly by them.

The enhancement in value and appreciation of nonmarital assets resulting either from the efforts of either party during the marriage or from the contribution to or expenditure thereon of marital funds or other forms of marital assets, or both.

Interspousal gifts during the marriage.

All vested and nonvested benefits, rights, and funds accrued during the marriage in retirement, pension, profit sharing, annuity, deferred compensation, and insurance plans and programs.

All real property held by the parties as tenants by the entireties, whether acquired prior to or during the marriage, shall be presumed to be a marital asset. If a party wants to make a claim to the contrary, the burden of proof shall be on the party asserting the claim that the subject property, or some portion thereof, is not marital
All personal property titled jointly by the parties as tenants by the entireties, whether acquired prior to or during the marriage, shall be presumed to be a marital asset. In the event a party makes a claim to the contrary, the burden of proof shall be on the party asserting the claim that the subject property, or some portion thereof, is nonmarital.