Articles Posted in Financial affidavits

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In dissolution of marriage actions, attorney’s fees are frequently awarded when there is a large disparity in the parties incomes. Generally speaking, the underlying premise is to “put the litigants on an even playing field.” Both parties should have the ability to retain and be represented by competent counsel throughout the dissolution of marriage proceedings. This holds true whether the proceedings are in Boca Raton, Delray Beach, Fort Lauderdale, or anywhere else throughout the state of Florida.

The award of attorney’s fees is governed by Florida Statute 61.16, which is titled as Attorney’s fees, suit money and costs. An award of attorney’s fees requires both of the parties to appear in front of the judge and to present their evidence regarding income, expenses, and their respective needs for an attorney’s fee request.

A judge has the discretion to make an award of attorney’s fees on both a temporary basis as the case is progressing, as well as on a permanent basis as the case is concluding.

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In a case recently decided, a wife was awarded an astounding sum of $75,000.00 per month for temporary support for herself and her child. Stanton v. Stanton, 2D10-919 (2010).

The appellate court said this amount simply could not stand, as the amount was not supported by competent substantial evidence.

The trial court should consider the standard of living in addition to the need of one spouse and the other spouse’s ability to pay. de Gutierrez v. Gutierrez, 19 So.3d 1110, 1113 (Fla. 2d DCA 2009).

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coins question mark desktop.jpgIn every dissolution of marriage action filed in Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, or anywhere else throughout the state of Florida, the parties are required to file a financial affidavit which details their income, expenses, assets and liabilities. The importance of filing this document in an accurate manner cannot be over emphasized.

What happens when assets are not disclosed by a party to the divorce proceeding?

In Romero v. Romero, 959 So.2d 333 (Fla. 3DCA 2007), the husband failed to disclose stock options he had received over the course of the marriage, and which the wife was unaware of. They were ultimately discovered by her after the proceedings concluded, and she subsequently tried to reach them through the use of a constructive trust.